The 411 about Aquatic Exercises While Pregnant

Many mommies-to-be wonder how safe it is to do aquatic exercises while pregnant.

And they are right to ask this since pregnancy can be very difficult even for the most eager of them. The entire center of balance shifts and even fit women have difficulties managing this added body weight. Expectant moms must cope with back pain, swollen feet, and an overall sensation to lie down and avoid moving altogether instead of wobbling everywhere.

No need to worry here, though, since water exercises are some of the most recommended types of exercises. They can make all mommies feel comfortable in their own skin once again. These are low-impact movements. They are possible due to the density of the water which can take the weight of the belly off the spine and give the mommy some much-needed relief.

Here is why aquatic exercises while pregnant are so great:
  1. Water is soothing.

This isn’t big news to anyone. If you want to connect with your little one, doing aquatic exercises while pregnant can also give you an idea of just how comfortable he is inside your belly. You can feel just as relaxed and protected as your little one does and maybe it will feel even more worth it.

  1. Regain your stance and vigor.

The buoyancy of the water will help you regain your stance as you will no longer feel weighed down. You will also be able to do more difficult yoga poses with great support for your back and limbs.

  1. Cool down.

Feeling constantly hot is also an issue as you can no longer tell the difference between “pregnancy hot” or really hot outside. It will not matter in the water. Just make sure that it is a comfortable water temperature of 85-87 degrees (with 83 being considered too cold).

One important thing to keep in mind when doing aquatic exercises while pregnant is that, even though you’re in the water, this does not mean you cannot get dehydrated. Your body still loses water; you just don’t notice it. Make sure you keep a bottle of water by the side of the pool and sip from it from time to time. Dehydration may lead to uterine contractions and you do not want that.

  1. You can do more repetitions.

Even if you are more determined and you stick to a workout routine, doing more repetitions is more difficult on land than it is in the water. You can do your own set of aquatic exercises while pregnant or follow a routine at any of the specialized aqua gyms.

  1. There is a large variety of exercises to do.

Many of the restrictions you have on land disappear in the water. You can make running movements in the water, do some jumping jacks, do the opposite elbow to knee and side-to-side lunges. The much-needed light cardio exercises are possible now. Doing aquatic exercises while pregnant can really help you strengthen your core. Even if you got pregnant before preparing your body for the effort of carrying your baby for nine months, water exercises can help you get in shape as you get bigger.

  1. Don’t push yourself!

Because it feels easier, you might be tempted to squeeze in more exercise than you can handle. Raising your heartbeat to more than 140bpm is not safe. Remember that you are doing this to make yourself feel better, not worse.

Specialists recommend doing the “talk test” – see how much you can exercise and talk at the same time before you run out of breath. Only do exercises through which you can continue normal conversation.

Overdoing it in the water is just as dangerous as it is on land. It can lead to shortness of breath, vaginal bleeding, dizziness, contractions and elevated blood pressure. These are all things why you are trying to avoid by aquatic exercises while pregnant.

There are a lot of advantages to doing aquatic exercises while pregnant as long as you keep it mild and safe. If anything makes you feel at all uncomfortable that is a clear sign you should stop. Otherwise, keep up the good work and continue doing this even after childbirth. This it is a nice and gentle way to restart working out.

 

Sources:
www.fitpregnancy.com
www.livestrong.com
www.babycenter.com

Featured image source: www.webmd.com 



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